- page 15

15
NOVEMBER 2015
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The Canadian Business Journal
be the controller of choice because of the speed,
simplicity and reliability of it,” he says.
Reducing soil compaction while improv-
ing soil health and crop production are all tied
together as part of the main objective. But there
are numerous additional benefits to inflating and
deflating tires on farm vehicles.
“The system is made from a farmer’s per-
spective, but we have used excellent engineers
who have built it to our required criteria, mak-
ing it practical and beneficial for the farmer. The
teamwork has been great. It’s also huge for the
environment,” Kraayenbrink mentions. “We can
reduce fuel consumption in the springtime by at
least 15%. There is also a huge saving on rubber.
Making a tire last 25% longer is significant.”
To illustrate how the system works, imagine
having a 10-speed racing bike and a mountain
bike in the sandy dunes. The mountain bike rides
over top of the sand and takes less energy than
the 10-speed because of its wider tires, whereas
the narrow tires of the 10-speed sink into the
sand. Conversely, on a paved road the tires on
the 10-speed bike have less surface area and
requires less energy to accumulate speed, while
the bulkier mountain bike tires serve to slow a
rider down, creating more friction with the sur-
face of the road. The same methodology holds
true with farm vehicle tires and the hard or soft
compound being driven on.
The bottom line is that the inflation-defla-
tion system allows farmers to get into the fields
sooner, and time is money. It’s preferable not
to have to go into the fields during periods of
“We can reduce fuel
consumption in the
springtime by at least 15%.
There is also a huge saving on
rubber. Making a tire last 25%
longer is significant.”
– Jake Kraayenbrink
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