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17
NOVEMBER 2015
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The Canadian Business Journal
detrimental weather, but if rain is unrelenting for
a week or two at a time, there is no choice but to
get the job done. Kraayenbrink says that with the
system and having a larger footprint there is the
ability to get into the fields earlier.
“The idea is not to promote that (entering the
fields in bad weather) but the reality is that farmers
are often faced with that scenario of having to get
into the fields because the weather just isn’t giving
up – it’s raining every day. This widens the period
of application for getting the job done. We also
seem to have more weather extremes nowadays,
so having that equipment is a benefit,” he says.
If soil on a farm is densely compacted it will
not absorb nutrients in the water the way less
compacted land could, and as such it directly
affects the ability to grow healthy crops in the
field. Based on studies, the No.1 yield robber of
crops is in fact soil compaction.
“Compaction and its effects are difficult to
measure,” Kraayenbrink remarks. “It depends what
soil you have, along with the health of it and the
moisture.”
Distribution Network
Expansion
Now that AgriBrink has patented its controller
one of Kraayenbrink’s goals as they move into the
manufacturing phase is to bring down the cost of
the system and also to develop a wide-ranging
distribution network.
“We don’t have the resources to order 1,000
units to get the price down,” he candidly admits.
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