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SEPTEMBER 2015
«
The Canadian Business Journal
to post-secondary education around the world,
with more than 30 million members. The CAUT
co-hosted the event in Ottawa, where nearly two
thousand delegates from around the world were
on hand. Topics included everything from dete-
rioration of working conditions and labour rights
to privatization of schools in Africa and elsewhere
around the globe.
“CAUT made a point of standing up for con-
tract academics and passing resolutions directing
the international community to make it a prior-
ity to work towards fairness for all professors
and teachers in giving them job security and fair
wages,” Vose says.
The achievements and successes of the
CAUT are impressive and even more so when
doing a direct comparison with similar organi-
zations in other countries, including the United
States. Vose has colleagues south of the border
who have spoken out against their administra-
tions and they’ve paid the price in losing their
jobs. Academic freedom is much more robust
in Canada than just about anywhere else in the
world, and it’s significantly due to the ongoing
efforts of CAUT.
In the next three to five years Vose wants
to see the CAUT continue with its core efforts
pertaining to academic freedom and protect-
ing the working conditions for all staff, which
includes better equity for faculty and students,
where women and minorities feel welcome and
can fully participate. This fall the CAUT will host
an Aboriginal forum in Winnipeg in an effort to
keep issues in that regard front and centre. In
the past there has been much discussion and
problems have been identified, but Vose says
it’s time to actually put words into motion and
apply those thoughts and ideas into real life,
practical initiatives.
“I would highlight the role of Indigenous
knowledge and Aboriginal education in univer-
sities,” he says. “It’s time to take action on our
woeful history of excluding and marginalizing
Aboriginal peoples from the academy.”
Vose also hopes to see a higher level of
engagement and participation and by extension a
feeling of ownership of the CAUT by all member
associations so everyone is made aware of the
excellent work being spearheaded. It’s a desire
to have everyone feel that the CAUT truly is an
association for everyone who has membership.
“All society should have an interest in making
sure that education is accessible and equitable
and free to pursue the best new ideas in science
and culture,” Vose says. “It’s about collaborating
to improve knowledge.”
CBJ
Photo credits: Paul B Jones
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