DUC re-wilds project on Rivière du Nord

DUC re-wilds project on Rivière du Nord

FREDERICTON, New Brunswick, Dec. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Sea-level rise is projected to hit the Maritimes in a major way, estimated to climb anywhere from 26 to 100 centimetres by 2100. Coastal salt marshes are a natural defence against storm surges, as their reedy grasses provide a stable base, buffering wave action on the coast.
That’s why Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) is taking steps to restore these saltwater marshes, and in some cases, completely adapting its habitat management of its own projects to make it happen.A decades-old DUC habitat project site at Rivière du Nord on New Brunswick’s Acadian Peninsula is one example where DUC is taking this new course of action. DUC developed the site in 1992 to increase waterfowl breeding habitat while maintaining the stocks of fish like Atlantic salmon and brook trout.DUC built a 250-metre dike, converting the salt marsh into an artificial freshwater site, complete with a fish ladder, which allowed fish to access the habitat within the upper tributary. The freshwater marsh provided important breeding habitat for American black ducks and a host of other wetland species.This fall, DUC breached the dike to allow salt water to flow back into the marsh so the habitat functions more naturally. Within a few months of the tidal exchange, salt grasses will begin to pop up. Over the next two to five years, the marsh will be on its way to fighting against the coastal erosion of New Brunswick’s shores.These efforts are also expected to help stabilize the population of Maritime ringlets, an endangered butterfly species. Maritime ringlets have made a habitat just 500 metres away from the restored marsh, on the banks of the Rivière du Nord. Once the salt marsh is restored, experts hope the butterflies will make their way over and repopulate.Full story: https://www.ducks.ca/stories/atlantic/re-wilding-at-riviere-du-nord/Quotes/Available for interviews:“Salmon and trout will still be in the picture, and also smelt will use that system. There’s a significant nutrient load that gaspereau bring into these systems that help it function. American eels are also an extremely important species within this system. Through this restoration work, we hope to provide improved access to their habitat. They have been in steady decline over a number of years. Waterfowl will also continue to benefit as black ducks will make extensive use of this marsh during spring and fall migration periods.”Frank Merrill, DUC conservation program specialist, New Brunswick.
“It’s peaceful. It’s like having an Aspirin. If you get a headache, you take an Aspirin. If I get a headache, I go in the marsh.”Philip Bouchard, aka “Mr. Duck”, longtime DUC volunteer
Ducks Unlimited Canada delivers wetland conservation that benefits every Canadian. We keep the water in your lakes and rivers clean. We protect your community from the effects of flood and drought. We save wildlife and special natural places. We use science to find solutions to the most important environmental issues of the day and we collaborate with people who are helping create a healthier world. The wetlands we save aren’t just for ducks; they’re for all of us.For an interview or to learn more about this story, please contact:Frank Merrill
Conservation program specialist, Ducks Unlimited Canada
f_merrill@ducks.ca
Phone: 506-442-1994
Photo accompanying this announcement are available athttps://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/03d84adb-995d-46c1-b010-5d9517290c11https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0f50c30b-0598-43a8-928c-eb988753fb0a

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